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20130113
20130121
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CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 1
FBC 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in that time to clear the way for negotiations on long-term deficit reduction, to add muscle to the efforts to bring democrats to the table, they would include a provision in the debt ceiling legislation saying that lawmakers will not be paid if they do not pass a budget blueprint. was it right to step back from challenging the president over raising the debt ceiling? >> well, i think the house proposal is a step in the right direction. no doubt the senate hasn't done it's job. it's been nearly four years since it's passed a budget. but it doesn't go nearly far enough. we have a crisis. i just got back last week from afghanistan. and i had multiple servicemen and women clasp me on the arm and say, please do something about the debt and deficit. we're bankrupting the country. that's what the american people are looking for. and to date, politicians have both parties have been unwilling to take even a tiny step in the right direction. we've got to fix the problem. >> the senate has to pass a budget. do you believe that? >> i do. >> why has it been four years since you've done that? >> well, l
bills. but as part of the deal senate democrats must agree on a budget that addresses long-term deficit reduction. if there's no agreement in three months, republicans propose that no one in congress gets paid. >>> and now we turn to our special presidential inauguration coverage. as washington prepares for two days of inaugural events we have the results of a new cbs/new york times poll. the pr begins his second term with a 51% approval rating. that's similar to what president bush had at the start of his second term. let's get more from white house senior correspondent bill plante who's about a mile from the white house. bill, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you, rebecca. well as president obama's first term morphs into his second there's really no change to a jen da. but for the next couple of days a brief holiday from gridlock and a window for celebration. last-minute preparations are under way at the capitol where the president will take the oath of office and at the parade reviewing stand at the front of the white house. because the constitution says
in the late 1980's when we didn't have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the deficit was only $3 trillion. but we've so badly mismanaged our money after that, by the time we got to hurricane katrina in 2005, that we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster relief and paid for and offset about 40% of it. but we didn't learn. we didn't learn from those mistakes and we've continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a point now where we're at $16 trillion today and it's incumbent upon us to have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this. and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it. i wish very much that we weren't here today. i wish very much that we could pass this and easily borrow the money, without any questions whatsoever. but we've wasted that opportunity. we've mismanaged our own finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care of our own. think about that for a second. in the united states of america we do not have enough money to take care of our own c
to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a deadbeat nation really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, secondhand, much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some realizes the potential consequences. host: if
this. yes, it may run up the immediate deficit, but once again, for every dollar that we invest in those levees we not only save lives and property, but we put people to work and we get the economic engine going. further up in my district, again, along the sacramento and the rivers, i have a project that's 44 miles of levee that clearly will fail. it has failed four times in the last 60 years. lives have been lost. one of the most catastrophic failures of a levee happened in this stretch of river. we need to rebuild that. the federal government's role in these construction projects of these levees has gone back to the very beginning of this nation and it is congress' task to allocate the money to decide the projects that are going to be built. but unfortunately we tied ourselves in knots here with certain rules that have been put in by our republican colleagues that prevent us from taking the necessary action to protect our communities. we're not talking about, you know, willy nily unnecessary projects. we're talking about saving -- nilly unnecessary projects. we're talking abou
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. unanimitydon't have in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to r
of the debt ceiling, but because they want a credible deficit reduction plan, and the president doesn't seem to be interested in actually coming up with a credible way to deal with the amount of spending we are doing in this country. bill: if that is the says, doyoo many me, do you think it can get through the senate. >> i imagine harry reid under the direction of the president will try to block these things. i'm going to continue to cosponsor senator haopl me's plan. we have a spending problem in this country. they know it in wyoming, families have to balance their budget every year. many states do. we do in wyoming. it's time for this senate and the house and the president to get serious about limiting our spending and specifically the wasteful spending that continues. in the last hour stewart varney and martha talked about some of the abuses that continue to go on. people know that their tax dollars are being wasted. we need to get the spending under control. bill: two days ago brit hume told us this will be bloody, this battle. will it? >> the future of our country is at stake here and t
remains committed to further reducing the deficit in a balanced way. so that is the response from the white house after the gop at its retreat in virginia came out with the possibility that perhaps we could extend the debt limit for another three months but the senate has to pass a budget, so the republicans which it has not done in four years. so. tracy: no surprise from the white us house. ashley: says no. tracy: okay, then. how about this. hank paulson says he hates the debt limit. you remember the former treasury secretary, the guy who said i need $700 billion right now? no wonder he hates it. ashley: don't we all. tracy: he has given a rare interview. we have details on that next. ashley: first a look at today's winners and losers. the dow just above the water mark. take a look. we'll be right back. ♪ chances are you've become, a better driver over the years. and one company thinks your auto insurance rates should get better too. presenting the aarp auto insurance program from the hartford. i'm a good driver. have been for years. it just makes sense that better, more experi
veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put at a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to dig out of that. it is very difficult for organizations, especially in a crisis response, to think about just releasing the information before it's asked for and remove that deficit. i've been involved in several situations where the information was available and the information was understandable and probably mitigated some of the concerns, but because of the way the companies in the government work, it was difficult to make that transparent and then catching up with that with the american public is really, really difficult. nancy and marcia, we had talked about this with jay a lot. one of the problems we have in mental anguishing impacts -- measuring the impacts of the spill in the gulf is the lack of the background of the presence of hydrocarbons as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. in the context of moving beyond the direct aims of the research that's going to be conducted with the bp money, what do you think the lar
. the problem is if you'd inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put out a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to get out of that, and it is difficult for or organizations to think about releasing the information before it is out for. -- asked for. i have been involved in several situations where the information was available and understandable. it mitigated some concerns. it was difficult to make that transparent, and catching up with that is really difficult. one reason for the impact was the lack of information as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. as a context for moving beyond the research done, what do you think the larger research agenda ought to be about? >> the hydrocarbons in the continental shelf and inland areas are pretty well known. it is the deep sea we did not have information for. i think the deep sea ecosystem is an area we need to emphasize, and some of the longer living organisms such as marine mammals. one of the issues is the effect of multiple stressors. we have some smart jury is that were heavily oiled, and s
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)